Connect with us

Foreign Celebrity

Spartan slayer puts the ‘eek’ in Greek: PETER HOSKIN reviews God of War 

Published

on

Spartan slayer puts the 'eek' in Greek: PETER HOSKIN reviews God of War 

God Of War (PC, £39.99)

Rating: Spartan slayer puts the 'eek' in Greek: PETER HOSKIN reviews God of War 

Verdict: Muscular myth-making 

When you think about it, the Greek myths really were quite violent. The titan Cronus castrating his own father; Zeus straight-up eating his rivals; Achilles and Hector scrapping outside Troy… all that Peloponnesian jazz.

But the developers of the God Of War series haven’t just thought about the violence of Greek mythology — they’ve made the most of it. In half a dozen games since 2005, they’ve had the Spartan sociopath Kratos tear through the entire pantheon of Grecian gods, titans and monsters. The colour red has featured heavily.

Until 2018, that is. That was when the series started anew on PlayStation, with another game called, simply, God Of War. 

The main character was still Kratos, and he still knew how to handle himself in a fight, but this time his labours were taking place in Norse mythology, where the trolls and Valkyries roam. It was sublime; one of the best games of that year.

And now it could be one of the best games of this year, too — because the PlayStation release has just been translated across to PCs, where it has the opportunity to run smoother and look even finer.

It’s part of an ongoing effort by Sony to make their previously ‘exclusive’ games more inclusive. Or perhaps to make a buck out of people with home computers.

READ ALSO  Amanda Holden, 50, poses NAKED for a new fashion campaign with Davina McCall who dons a mini dress

Other mighty PlayStation titles, such as Horizon Zero Dawn and Death Stranding, have also recently been allowed to make the transition.

God Of War is a worthy game for PCs. It’s not just the change in location that makes it special — although, gosh, the Norse realms are dazzlingly pretty — it’s also the change in emphasis. 

In previous games, the increasingly silly violence became the point. In this one, the point is the effect of that violence on a world-weary man and those around him.

Spartan slayer puts the 'eek' in Greek: PETER HOSKIN reviews God of War 

Spartan slayer puts the 'eek' in Greek: PETER HOSKIN reviews God of War 

Spartan slayer puts the 'eek' in Greek: PETER HOSKIN reviews God of War 

Spartan slayer puts the 'eek' in Greek: PETER HOSKIN reviews God of War 

Spartan slayer puts the 'eek' in Greek: PETER HOSKIN reviews God of War 

Spartan slayer puts the 'eek' in Greek: PETER HOSKIN reviews God of War 

Spartan slayer puts the 'eek' in Greek: PETER HOSKIN reviews God of War 

Spartan slayer puts the 'eek' in Greek: PETER HOSKIN reviews God of War 

Spartan slayer puts the 'eek' in Greek: PETER HOSKIN reviews God of War 

Spartan slayer puts the 'eek' in Greek: PETER HOSKIN reviews God of War 

Spartan slayer puts the 'eek' in Greek: PETER HOSKIN reviews God of War 

Spartan slayer puts the 'eek' in Greek: PETER HOSKIN reviews God of War 

Spartan slayer puts the 'eek' in Greek: PETER HOSKIN reviews God of War 

Spartan slayer puts the 'eek' in Greek: PETER HOSKIN reviews God of War 

Spartan slayer puts the 'eek' in Greek: PETER HOSKIN reviews God of War 

Spartan slayer puts the 'eek' in Greek: PETER HOSKIN reviews God of War 

Spartan slayer puts the 'eek' in Greek: PETER HOSKIN reviews God of War 

Spartan slayer puts the 'eek' in Greek: PETER HOSKIN reviews God of War 

Spartan slayer puts the 'eek' in Greek: PETER HOSKIN reviews God of War 

Spartan slayer puts the 'eek' in Greek: PETER HOSKIN reviews God of War 

Even if you did play previous God Of War games for the earth-shaking combat, that’s here too

Even if you did play previous God Of War games for the earth-shaking combat, that’s here too

Even if you did play previous God Of War games for the earth-shaking combat, that’s here too

What has made Kratos so reflective? In a word, fatherhood. He’s joined by his son, a nipper called Atreus, on a quest to deliver the ashes of his dead wife — Atreus’s mother — up a mountain. Atreus is both a likeably chatty presence and a neat gameplay addition, firing arrows at enemies from the sidelines.

READ ALSO  Sigourney Weaver does a spot of shopping on Sydney's upmarket North Shore

At times, the daddy issues — Kratos’s journey from calling his son ‘boy’ to calling him, well, ‘son’ — are expressed rather clumsily. 

But the overall story is so compelling, as are all the other elements, that it doesn’t really matter. 

Even if you did play previous God Of War games for the earth-shaking combat, that’s here too.

And now is a good moment to catch up, not least because a sequel is due later this year. It’s called God Of War Ragnarök. The end of times. I can’t wait.

Spartan slayer puts the 'eek' in Greek: PETER HOSKIN reviews God of War Source

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Follow Us on Facebook

Get Stories Via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe Celebrity Gig Magazine and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 228,525 other subscribers

Trending

%d bloggers like this: